Halloween Safety: No Tricks, Just Treats

Everyone loves a good scare on Halloween, but not when it comes to child safety. There are several easy and effective behaviors that parents can share with kids to help reduce their risk of injury.

Do you remember how much fun it was to get dressed up as your favorite action hero, cartoon character or princess and go door-to door- for Halloween treats? Well, your children now get to experience that same joy. Just as your parents did for you, now it’s your turn to prevent Halloween accidents and injuries by supervising your children closely. 

Scary Fact: On average, children are more than twice as likely to be hit by a car and killed on Halloween than on any other day of the year!

As you’re putting the finishing touches on your child’s costumes, be sure to add something so they will be seen by drivers. Kids can wear glowsticks or carry flashlights to make them easily seen by drivers.

This Infographic from Safe Kids Worldwide highlights some important safety tips to help remind your little ghouls, goblins, super heroes and fairy princesses to help stay safe this Halloween.

Safekids USA 2013 Halloween Safety Infographic

Infographic courtesy of Safe Kids Worldwide

Visit Safe Kids Worldwide more tips on how to keep your kids happy and healthy on Halloween HERE.

Have a Spooky, yet SAFE Halloween!

The Dangers of Teens Behind the Wheel

Are you familiar with the “disease” that is the leading killer of teenagers, claiming the lives of 2,400 each year? What’s more is that this “disease” could easily be prevented through inexpensive behavior changes.

The truth is, no such “disease” exists: motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of teenage deaths – not any disease.1,2 In 2012, 2,439 teen drivers and passengers died in motor vehicle crashes.3 In half of these fatal crashes, the teen wasn’t using a seat belt, and this proportion has been relatively unchanged over the last decade. In both fatal and nonfatal crashes, a greater percentage of passengers are unrestrained than drivers.4

SERIOUSLY how freaking hard is it to take 5 seconds to buckle up?!?!

The top reason teens gave for not buckling up is that they “forgot”, or that it just wasn’t a habit.  Note to Parents: These habits start young! Teens who aren’t using seat belts have indicated that they do not  see their parents use a seat belt when they drive. So parents: In order to help your teen stay safe on the road, set a good example!! Of course, not using a seat belt is only part of the issue. Teens who don’t use seat belts are almost more likely to admit that they text while driving than those who do wear seat belts — a problem that we all know is much too common. Of teens who don’t use  a seat belt admit to 73% texting while driving —  compared to 52% for those who do wear their seat belt. Granted, the goal is to have 0% of drivers texting and driving, but the point is that danger has been compounded by not wearing a seat belt with the greater likelihood of texting while driving.  Keeping teens safe in cars starts long before they are ready to drive or ride with friends. By following these tips, we can make sure that teens are making safe decisions when riding as passengers today and drivers tomorrow:

  • Make using a seat belt for every ride a habit, starting when kids are young.
  • Be a safety role model by observing speed limits, putting phones away while driving, and following the rules of the road.
  • Talk to teens and kids about ways to speak up if a driver of any age isn’t driving safely

Teens in Cars (SafeKids) Infographic courtesy of Safe Kids Worldwide

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Related articles:

Sources:
1. CDC Leading Causes of Death for Ages 13-19 in 2010
2. NHTSA 2010 Fatality Analysis (Ages 13-19)
3. NHTSA 2012 Fatality Analysis (Ages 13-19)
4. NHTSA 2003-2012 Fatality Analysis by Restraint Use (Ages 13-19)

Buckle Up: Every Ride. Every Time. Every Age.

Did you know that 1 in 4 parents admit to not buckling up their kids?!?

What’s even more mind-blowing is that parents who have graduate degrees are TWICE as likely to say that it is acceptable to driving without buckling up their children!

SafeKids USA Buckle UP

Infographic courtesy of SafeKids.org

Based on these findings, Safe Kids offers these three strategies for parents to keep their kids safe while riding in cars:

  1. Buckle up kids on every ride, every time.
  2. Talk to other parents who are driving your kids about the importance of buckling up.
  3. Check that the right child safety seat is being used and that it’s installed properly.